Quantum Stuffs More LTO Capacity into Its Scalar i6000 Tape Library

Posted on July 30, 2015 By Pedro Hernandez

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Quantum has upgraded its Scalar i6000 tape library, allowing organizations to backup and archive more data in less space while cutting their electric bills.

The redesigned Linear Tape-Open (LTO) system doubles the number of full-height tape drives that fit in a 19-inch rack, compared to its predecessors. And Quantum's not done yet.

The i6000 will scales to 12,006 cartridges and an expected 190 PB when LTO-7 tapes with 6.4 TB of capacity hit the market later this year. In a July 29 announcement, the company revealed that it expects "to expand Scalar i6000 capacity further in 2016, scaling to more than 15,000 slots, or more than 225 PB, in a single system. Customers and partners that invest in the library today will benefit from this increased capacity as their archive data grows."

Also new is support for RESTful Web services, enabling automated management and configuration. The addition, boasted Quantum, provides the i6000 with "the most comprehensive suite of web services available for an LTO tape library — anything that can be done from the graphical user interface can now be done via web services." Incidentally, the system's management interface has been streamlined to help minimize clicking and present information in a more user-friendly manner.

Finally, the i6000 embraces more environmentally-friendly IT practices with new, more energy-efficient power supplies.

"As the only tape library with 80 PLUS certified power supplies, the Scalar i6000 provides the most energy-efficient usage and reinforces tape's position as the lowest cost, lowest power storage technology," stated the company. Compared to conventional power supplies, 80 Plus-rated hardware wastes 20 percent or less of the electricity it takes in as heat.

Besides data center archiving, Quantum is targeting media and entertainment companies with technologies like the company's data availability-enhancing Extended Data Life Management (EDLM) and Active Vault. As the use of high-definition cameras increases and video retention times lengthen, video surveillance archives can also benefit from the system's new higher tape density, the company asserts.

Finally, the i6000's advanced robotics helps high-performance computing (HPC) environments get a handle on their massive data requirements. "For high-duty cycle uses such as archiving parallel file system data, geospatial data and other HPC applications, the new Scalar i6000 modular design and unique approach to dual robotics enables systems to be configured for optimized performance," said the company.

Pedro Hernandez is a contributing editor at InfoStor. Follow him on Twitter @ecoINSITE.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.


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