Iomega Ships New Array for Small and Mid-size Businesses

Posted on August 23, 2011 By Stuart J. Johnston

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Iomega announced Tuesday that it is shipping its StorCenter px12-350r Network Storage Array, a new rack mount NAS array for small and mid-sized businesses, and remote enterprises.

An EMC (NYSE: EMC) company, Iomega's StorCenter px12-350r Network Storage Array replaces the firm's nearly year and a half-year old StorCenter ix12-300r as the company's top-of-the-line NAS storage array, according to Iomega statements.

The aim is to provide smaller companies with the kinds of storage resources that larger enterprises have access to but at costs more in line with customers that don't have large enterprise budgets.

"The px12-350r [is] ideally suited for use in production data stores, server virtualization, backup-to-disk target, and video surveillance," the company said.

The StorCenter px12-350r comes in a 2U form factor rack mount NAS with 12 drive extension slots that can hold 7200 rpm hard-disk drives (HDD), as compared to 5900 rpm HDDs on the StorCenter ix12-300r. It also features support for RAID levels 1, 10, 5 and 6 with hot spare, automatic RAID rebuild and hot swap capabilities.

Additionally, customers can equip the units with up to 128 GB of high-performance solid-state drives (SSD) from Iomega.

Each unit is built on an Intel Core2Duo CPU with 4 GB of memory, along with four Gigabit Ethernet ports for iSCSI or TCP/IP, the company added. The unit is capable of 425 MB per second in sequential read I/O performance, Iomega statements said.

Further, the px12-350r is certified for use with leading server products, including VMware vSphere 5, Citrix XenServer 5.6, and Windows Server 2003/2008/2008 R2.

In addition, the px12-350r is the only storage product that natively supports EMC's Avamar sub-file deduplication for remote office/branch office (ROBO) backup, Jay Krone, Iomega's senior director of network products, told InternetNews.com.

An entry level px12-350r fully-equipped with the maximum 36 TB of storage starts at less than $10,500.

Stuart J. Johnston is a contributing editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of Internet.com, the network for technology professionals. Follow him on Twitter @stuartj1000.


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