SSP Sanrise targets enterprises

Posted on April 01, 2001

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BY LISA COLEMAN

Sanrise is targeting enterprise companies with its backup/recovery and disk-on-demand services. The Dublin, CA-based storage service provider (SSP), founded in 1999, recently acquired the assets and assumed operations of Exodus Communi-cations' DataVault storage service business, which pumped more than 600 customers into Sanrise's account base.

Last month, the company completed its second round of financing and has raised more than $160 million. With its acquisition of Exodus' DataVault and an agreement with Global Center, Sanrise plans to "aggressively go after the enterprise market," says Doug Murray, vice president of marketing.

To ramp up its enterprise business, Sanrise recently introduced "storagetone" services and "storagecel," a pre-configured storage "cage" that combines hardware and software for scalability up to 40TB. Like other SSPs, Sanrise offers a portal for viewing its services such as status of backups. The company has partnered with Hitachi and Hitachi Data Systems, StorageTek, Crossroads, Sun, Brocade, Oracle, Foundry, and Veritas to integrate their products into its SSP offerings.

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Sanrise is one of the first SSPs to offer "five 9's" (99.999%) data availability written into its service level agreement (SLA) for disk-on-demand services. SLAs detail how services are provided and what remedies will be offered in case of failure to provide data availability. Many SSPs write 99.99% into their SLAs but deliver 99.999% availability although they do not write that level of availability into their SLAs.

Pricing is $10 to $58 per managed GB for Sanrise's services, while the current industry average is $20 to $60 per managed GB. When prices reach the higher end of the range, it typically includes many more services than standard backup and availability.

Like other SSPs, Sanrise delivers management and disk-on-demand services on-site at a customer's location or off-site through an Internet data center. In addition, the company has R&D facilities in Santa Clara and in Bangalor, India, as well as a centralized manufacturing facility in Indianapolis, IN.

The SSP market is expected to grow fast over the next five years. By 2003, Gartner Dataquest predicts the market will be about $6 billion. International Data Corp. expects storage utility spending worldwide will hit $10.7 billion by 2005.


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