Vaultize Ships Secure File Sync Appliances

Posted on September 08, 2014 By Pedro Hernandez

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Vaultize Technologies, a provider of enterprise file sync and share software, is getting into the hardware game.

On the heels of the launch of the company's eponymous file sharing platform, the company announced today the general availability of its Secure Content Access Gateway hardware appliances. The devices "provide VPN-free, secure and managed remote access to content stored in corporate repositories like file servers, NAS, Google Drive and SharePoint," stated Vaultize CTO and co-founder Ankur Panchbudhe in a company blog post.

Like the company's software-based solutions, the appliances blend file sync and share capabilities with data loss prevention and mobile device management (MDM) while eschewing virtual private networking (VPN) setups.

VPNs can stand in the way of today's mobile workforces, according to Steve Lubchansky, regional director of Vaultize North America.

"Enterprises today are facing increased demand from their mobile workforce to access data on enterprise content repositories that are behind the firewall to remain productive everywhere," he said in a statement. "The challenges for enterprise IT are multifold when the data goes beyond the company-managed devices to employee-owned devices through Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD)."

Arguing that data is only as secure as the device that it resides on, the company is taking on rivals like EMC Syncplicity and Dropbox by unifying file services and MDM.

Vaultize Secure Content Access Gateway appliances allow "users to securely and easily access their files and folders from anywhere without needing to do VPN, while giving IT administrators a single place to manage access control, mobility and collaboration based on many attributes of data, users and devices, providing better security, data protection, and compliance," stated Panchbudhe.

Files passed across Vaultize's platform are encrypted at the source and decrypted on the destination device. Users can access their accounts, or "vaults," with apps available for iOS, Android, Windows, Mac and Linux. A Microsoft Outlook add-on prevents data leakage -- and overstuffed inboxes -- by automatically converting file attachments into URLs.

The appliances "can scale up to 10,000 concurrent users," boasted Panchbudhe. They can link provide access to "hundreds of data sources including file servers and NAS that support CIFS/SMB, Google Drive and SharePoint (coming soon)," he wrote.

Granular management and configuration tools enable IT administrators to fine-tune their file access and sharing policies. "Attributes that can be used to create access control policies include geo-location of user or his device, IP ranges, time, names of files and folders, and so on," said Panchbudhe.

Pedro Hernandez is a contributing editor at InfoStor. Follow him on Twitter @ecoINSITE.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.


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